Sublingual Viter Energy Mints deliver a quick kick to the bloodstream

June 30, 2016 3 min read

Sublingual Viter Energy Mints deliver a quick kick to the bloodstream

Mint from Blackwell’s “A curious herbal”.
Credit: Wellcome Library, London

Sublingual Viter Energy Mints deliver a quick kick to the bloodstream. One of the fastest ways to get a drug, vitamin or caffeine into the body is through sublingual administration—that is, under the tongue, where the substance dissolves and quickly gets absorbed into the body.

That is how Viter Energy Mints, our product, delivers a load of invigorating caffeine and B vitamins into the bloodstream quickly.

Mood-altering

Caffeine is the most popular and well-known mood-altering substance in the world. About 90 percent of people worldwide rely on caffeine at least intermittently for a safe, healthy chemical energy boost.

What is less well known is that B vitamins also give a boost in energy if you are deficient in them because lack of B makes people feel tired. Vitamin B helps the body turn food into the energy it needs to get the work done and get through the day. Another thing a deficiency in B can do is cause anemia, which results in less oxygen going to your organs, which also causes fatigue.

Especially if your diet is based on plant foods, make sure to get vitamin B from a supplement because most B comes from animal-based foods, says Men’s Health. Viter Energy Mints are made to be safe for vegans and are also gluten-free and kosher.

Mints deliver a quick kick

Vitamins, caffeine, drugs and vaccines are all good candidates for sublingual administration—and Viter Energy Mints have two of those substances. If you took a pill or got caffeine in coffee or tea, it would have to travel the length of your gastrointestinal system, which is tough on nutrients, and then be metabolized through the liver. Sounds kind of old-fashioned, huh?

The concept is that the enzymes and bile in the digestive tract degrade and lessen the efficacy of any chemical or vitamin that enters it. Some websites call the GI tract a “hostile environment” for substances one is taking for one’s health. Of course, those enzymes and stomach acid are necessary to break down the food we eat to convert it into something the body can use.

A more potent dose

In addition to the quickness of the caffeine and B vitamins entering the bloodstream via the concentrated blood vessels under the tongue or inside the cheeks, a lower dose can be used sublingually and it is more potent than if you swallowed a pill, says a dentist writing for the Huffington Post.

Now, caffeine has a bitter taste. So Viter Energy Mints had to carefully decide how many milligrams of caffeine to put in each mint. Too much, and the mint won’t taste good. Too little, and the customer would have to take too many mints to get a nice caffeine buzz. We settled on 40 milligrams after trying a dozen combinations of caffeine, sweetener, wintergreen and menthol to come up with the best-tasting and most effective combination. They are strong, so if you like strong mint flavor you’ll love Viter Energy Mints.

That means each mint has about half the caffeine of a standard cup of coffee. They are especially handy if you can’t take a break for coffee or are doing something active where caffeinated drinks aren’t available, such as hiking or playing sports or in the field working.

Fresh breath

Another thing you may not have access to in the field is a toothbrush. Viter Energy Mints are made to freshen your breath as well as boost your energy.

 

Mark Miller
Mark Miller



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