Evidence shows that coffee is healthy for you

by Mark Miller March 24, 2016

Evidence shows that coffee is healthy for you

Studies demonstrating coffee’s beneficial health effects are piling up so fast it’s hard to keep track. According to various experts, coffee:

  • Reduces risk of heart disease, cancer and multiple sclerosis
  • Boosts semen production
  • Invigorates
  • Enhances memory
  • Alleviates fatigue
  • Reduces the risk of kidney stones
  • Helps alleviate migraine headaches 
  • Enhances the effect of over-the-counter painkillers
  • Enhances athletic performance

And it tastes great. The caffeine in coffee is slightly addictive, but it is not a dangerous, life-destroying drug like opiates or meth.

A 2015 study of more than 1.2 million people found that folks who drink 3 to 5 cups of black coffee a day have fewer heart problems than those who drink none. People who drink 5 or more cups don’t have any more problems than anyone else.

Two other studies, meta-analyses that collated data from 11 other research articles, found that drinking 2 to 6 cups a day results in a lower risk of stroke disease. One of those meta-studies included data from more than 500,000 participants.

A third study, another meta-study, found that people who drink moderate amounts of coffee have a lower risk of heart failure.

“A study looking at all cancers suggested that it might be associated with reduced overall cancer incidence and that the more you drank, the more protection was seen,” a New York Times article on all these studies states.

Good news for modern man

These studies are  really great news because caffeine is the most commonly consumed mood-altering substance in the entire world. Ninety percent of Americans regularly take caffeine in one form another. People are nuts about coffee and caffeine in general.

For years people were warned that coffee and caffeine consumption were bad for you. Coffee and other caffeine-containing substances were blamed for heart disease, cancer, stunted growth and psychological problems.

The New York Times, in reporting on these studies in May 2015, wrote:

No one is suggesting you drink more coffee for your health. But drinking moderate amounts of coffee is linked to lower rates of pretty much all cardiovascular disease, contrary to what many might have heard about the dangers of coffee or caffeine. Even consumers on the very high end of the spectrum appear to have minimal, if any, ill effects.

But let’s not cherry-pick. There are outcomes outside of heart health that matter. Many believe that coffee might be associated with an increased risk of cancer. Certainly, individual studies have found that to be the case, and these are sometimes highlighted by the news media. But in the aggregate, most of these negative outcomes disappear.

A meta-analysis published in 2007 found that increasing coffee consumption by two cups a day was associated with a lower relative risk of liver cancer by more than 40 percent. Two more recent studies confirmed these findings. Results from meta-analyses looking at prostate cancer found that in the higher-quality studies, coffee consumption was not associated with negative outcomes.

The Times wrote that lower risk of breast cancer has been found, but that a higher risk of lung cancer was found among those who smoke and drink coffee.

The author of The Times’ article, Aaron E. Carroll, points out that these studies looked at black coffee. That is, they did not consider coffee with cream and sugar and some of the fancy concoctions that pack more calories than a McDonald’s lunch.

Black, of course

Carroll points out that some coffee drinks from popular cafes and restaurants have fat, cholesterol (two enemies of good heart health when consumed in excess) and hundreds or even more than 1,000 calories. This graphic from the University of Maryland gives some popular drinks and their nutritional contents:

Carroll points out a few of the higher-calorie content coffee products and adds: “I won’t even mention the Cold Stone Creamery Gotta-Have-It-Sized Lotta Caramel Latte (1,790 calories, 90 grams of fat, 223 grams of carbs). Regular brewed coffee has 5 or fewer calories and no fat or carbohydrates.”

Evidence piles up that coffee is good for us

But what about coffee’s other benefits? It can help combat the severity of migraine headaches, as Viter Life pointed out in this blog.

“Caffeine does seem to treat headaches [and migraines],” neurologist and Professor Mary Quiceno of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center told EverydayHealth.com. “There are lots of different reasons why caffeine is thought to help people.”

Another Viter Life blog pointed out that caffeine can boost athletic stamina and speed so much that the International Olympic Committee once limited how much of it Olympic athletes could take. Caffeine was categorized as a performance-enhancing substance.

And caffeine can enhance memory and concentration, keep you alert, alleviate fatigue and sleep deprivation, and, according to CaffeineInformer, it reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes. That CaffeineInformer article has a long list of areas where caffeine benefits people’s health with links to the studies. Other areas where it may help is in boosting the production of semen, preventing erectile dysfunction, reducing suicide risk, reducing or preventing ringing in the ears and reducing risk of kidney stones.

But even when all those studies and urban legends came out years ago about the supposed negative effects of caffeine, people kept right on drinking coffee, tea, soda and eating chocolate – all of which have caffeine in various amounts. “I’ll stop drinking coffee when they take it from my cold, dead hands,” was the sentiment.

Check out the coffee and caffeine memes on Twitter or Facebook. People are nuts about coffee.  This one is from @amoristicpillow:

But with all the love of coffee, there is a precaution, as illustrated by @twisteddoodles:

If you take caffeine too late in the day it can keep you awake. And too much caffeine can cause headaches, make one feel lightheaded, cause anxiety attacks and tremulousness.

Otherwise, enjoy!

Mark Miller
Mark Miller


Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in The Viter Energy Mints Blog

Is caffeine an appetite suppressant?
Is caffeine an appetite suppressant?

by Tina Sendin October 22, 2018

The holidays are upon us. It’s only October but with the rate this year has gotten to the tail-end, we’ll all be wearing our favorite sweatshirts (forcibly or otherwise) and devouring the holiday away in no time.

The forward-looking you will already be starting to watch that *extra holiday weight* before the holiday even starts.

But one step at a time, right? After all, there’s a few weeks left before the celebrations and holiday parties officially kick in.

If the java lover in you has ever been curious whether caffeine can help curb the appetite, now is the perfect time to find some answers.

The word on the street is that caffeine is one of the best appetite suppressants.

Spoiler alert: researches tell us the jury’s still out on this one. 

Read More
Caffeine sensitivity: all you need to know
Caffeine sensitivity: all you need to know

by Tina Sendin October 18, 2018

Have you been drinking coffee for years and starting to feel weird sensations after a cuppa? You’ve got to know something.

If you suddenly find yourself going through unusual post-caffeine effects such as anxiety, headache, faster heartbeat and tremors, you may be experiencing a shift in how your body metabolizes caffeine.

Two words: caffeine sensitivity.

Caffeine sensitivity is not necessarily a bad thing. Sometimes, it’s all a matter of our body adapting to caffeine in our system.

However, if all of a sudden you start to feel things that didn’t use to happen after having your caffeine fix, then it’s time to watch that caffeine intake!

Read More
8 ways caffeine affects your concentration and mental performance
8 ways caffeine affects your concentration and mental performance

by Tina Sendin October 15, 2018

What if I tell you that aside from perking you up, caffeine can also help you concentrate and become more productive?

If, during mind-numbing, brain-wracking moments, you want to feel like Popeye going for a whole can of spinach, just reach out for the coffee-maker and you’re likely to feel the same! (For the best java experience, know when’s the best time to drink your coffee here.)

Caffeine can also help you absorb information and remember them more efficiently.

Yep! Our favorite stimulant can boost mental performance in more ways than one. Have a cuppa and you’ll find yourself retaining more information from classes and business meetings, kill it in planning and problem-solving, and finish those day-to-day tasks efficiently.

Without further ado, here are 8 ways caffeine can help us take a step closer to becoming Einstein-genius:

Read More