Boost energy levels while working at home

by Mark Miller October 15, 2020 5 min read

As we said in this Viter Energy blog [5] about the work-life balance, it's a good idea to simulate your commute to work. You don't have to drive in to work, so instead take a walk around the block just before your workday starts and just after it ends. Send yourself a psychological signal.

And if you can avoid it, do not work after your walk around the block. Don't check work email. Don't answer calls from co-workers unless you really need to talk to them (or they are friends you socialize with).

Clinical psychologist Kelcey Stratton of Michigan Health Blog [6] has some sound advice on finding the right time to work:

If you’re a morning person, try to schedule important work and meetings during the first half of the day. Others may peak with energy in the afternoon. Depending on the type of job you have, try to maximize on these levels as you can.

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How do you stay awake on a road trip?

by Mark Miller October 01, 2020 4 min read

As we've been writing on this blog lately, there are long-term [1] and short-term [2] practices to remain alert and avoid becoming drowsy on the road.

The long-term practices are to get a good, healthy diet; sleep on a regular schedule, at least 7 hours a night (or day, if you work the graveyard shift); and exercise regularly to stay physically fit.

The short-term practices are more detailed. And we can all take a hint from truck drivers, who are experts in driving long distances and staying awake. 

Underlying both the short-term and long-term practices is judicious use of caffeine. If you rely too much on caffeine, one study finds [3], you run the risk of crashing. For truckers who get a good, healthy amount of caffeine, another study found [4], they can avoid crashes and save lives.

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How does caffeine affect your mood?

by Tina Sendin December 20, 2019 5 min read

Feeling down? Going through mood swings? Having one of those days?

What if I told you that you can turn your day around as easy as getting a caffeine fix?

I'm not pulling this out of a hat. Science suggests that caffeine is not just a stimulant that keeps you alert, it can also improve your mood and help you become a walking ball of sunshine. This may seem like a tall order for caffeine but wait ‘til you order a tall cup of coffee and experience it yourself!

Based on a review conducted by A. Nehlig, having 75mg of caffeine (a cup of coffee) every 4 hours can lead to a “pattern of sustained improvement of mood over the day.” It can increase alertness and well-being, help concentration, improve mood and limit depression. [1]

Keep reading to find out more!

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When's the best time to drink coffee?

by Tina Sendin December 06, 2019 4 min read

Want to hear something shocking? 

Having your caffeine fix first thing in the morning will NOT perk you up.

But the good news is, you no longer need to make that sluggish early morning trip to the coffee-maker daily, nor join that long rush hour queue in your go-to café.  

If you’re wondering whether we’re pulling some sick April Fool’s joke in the middle of August, there’s actually scientific evidence to all of this.

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8 effects of caffeine on your brain

by Tina Sendin October 25, 2019 4 min read

What if I tell you that aside from perking you up, caffeine can also help you concentrate and become more productive?

If, during mind-numbing, brain-wracking moments, you want to feel like Popeye going for a whole can of spinach, just reach out for the coffee-maker and you’re likely to feel the same! (For the best java experience, know when’s the best time to drink your coffee here.)

Caffeine can also help you absorb information and remember them more efficiently.

Yep! Our favorite stimulant can boost mental performance in more ways than one. Have a cuppa and you’ll find yourself retaining more information from classes and business meetings, kill it in planning and problem-solving, and finish those day-to-day tasks efficiently.

Without further ado, here are 8 ways caffeine can help us take a step closer to becoming Einstein-genius:

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Dry vs. wet caffeine: What’s the difference?

by Mark Miller August 31, 2017 4 min read

Anhydrous caffeine is derived from coffee beans, guarana berries and tea leaves and other natural plant sources. It is prepared in a lab and is reduced to white crystals. Anhydrous caffeine dissolves in water and mixes easily with other substances. But this powder is powerful in minute doses. It is best to allow experts who make approved products, guided by people who know the chemistry and how much to administer in, say, a caffeine pill or mint.

There are many articles and blogs on the World Wide Web touting caffeine as a supplement for enhancing athletic performance and increasing gain from weightlifting and other types of workouts

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Sublingual Viter Energy Mints deliver a quick kick to the bloodstream

by Mark Miller June 30, 2016 3 min read

Sublingual Viter Energy Mints deliver a quick kick to the bloodstream. One of the fastest ways to get a drug, vitamin or caffeine into the body is through sublingual administration—that is, under the tongue, where the substance dissolves and quickly gets absorbed into the body.

That is how Viter Energy Mints, our product, delivers a load of invigorating caffeine and B vitamins into the bloodstream quickly.

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How to not get tired after eating

by Mark Miller April 25, 2016 4 min read

If you’re getting sleepy at work in the afternoon or after your midday meal, it may be because you’re eating too many calories of carbohydrates, fats and sugars. So how do you avoid getting sleepy after meals?

Certain foods trigger the body to produce chemicals or hormones that induce drowsiness. To stay alert in the afternoon or whenever you have your meal during your shift, eat smaller amounts of food with less carbs, fat and sugars.

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What happens to the caffeine removed from coffee?

by Mark Miller March 10, 2016 4 min read

The writer, Dan Charles, bought a 4-ounce bag of caffeine and said it had as much caffeine as 1,000 tall Starbucks lattes. He said this caffeine was created in coffee beans on a hillside in the tropics. “Slowly and quietly, driven by the energy of sunlight, it formed inside coffee beans hanging on thousands of trees, most likely in Brazil or Vietnam,” Charles wrote.

“Those beans were harvested, loaded on ships bound for the port of Houston, Texas, and ended up at a factory within sight of downtown Houston: Atlantic Coffee Solutions. It’s owned by one of the world’s largest coffee traders, ECOM Agroindustrial Corp., which is based in Switzerland.”

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